agroforst 1199

Naturland

Naturland on International Coffee Day, 1st October

Naturland Kaffeeanbau in Indien 350Naturland coffee farmer in India 1st October is International Coffee Day. Coffee is far and away the most popular beverage in Germany. Here, consumption per capita last year was 162 litres. Consumers make high demands how their coffee is prepared, but it is also worth taking a look at how it is cultivated. Some ten million hectares in 70 countries throughout the world are devoted to coffee, and the way it is grown varies widely. “Naturland coffee is cultivated using cultivation methods appropriate to their geographical location and under shade trees, thus making a genuine contribution towards the environment and the climate,“ says Hans Hohenester, the chairman of the Naturland board of directors, on the occasion of International Coffee Day.

Essentially, two different methods of cultivation are employed to grow coffee, either as a monoculture or in the form of mixed cropping in agro forestry systems. Where coffee cultivation is concerned, Naturland far exceeds the requirements of the EU eco regulation, since its standards prescribe cultivating coffee in a manner appropriate to the respective geographical location and employing agro forestry systems with shade trees. This method of cultivation is particularly sustainable and produces many economic and organic advantages.

A variety of benefits for the environment and climate protection

Coffee agro forestry systems produce diverse environmental benefits: they protect the soil from erosion, contribute towards the protection of the water in catchment areas, and serve as a buffer against extremes of climate. Besides this, most areas where coffee is grown are in regions of great biodiversity, which makes it crucially important to adopt a compatible method of cultivation. Many surveys have proven that the number of animal and plant species is considerably greater in coffee agro forestry systems than in sun-grown coffee plantations.
Twenty per cent of global CO2 emissions are caused by the destruction of tropical rain forests. Semi-natural agro forestry systems on coffee plantations, on the other hand, contribute to the preservation of the tropical rainforest belt. Furthermore, surveys show that organic shade-grown coffee plantations fix at least one ton of carbon more per hectare than coffee plantations without shade trees, because more biomass is produced which is converted to humus in the soil. This is the equivalent of 3.7 tons per hectare a year.

Sustainable and multi-functional – a bonus for the farmers

Coffee agro forestry systems produce diverse environmental benefits: they protect the soil from erosion, contribute towards the protection of the water in catchment areas, and serve as a buffer against extremes of climate. Besides this, most areas where coffee is grown are in regions of great biodiversity, which makes it crucially important to adopt a compatible method of cultivation. Many surveys have proven that the number of animal and plant species is considerably greater in coffee agro forestry systems than in sun-grown coffee plantations.
Twenty per cent of global CO2 emissions are caused by the destruction of tropical rain forests. Semi-natural agro forestry systems on coffee plantations, on the other hand, contribute to the preservation of the tropical rainforest belt. Furthermore, surveys show that organic shade-grown coffee plantations fix at least one ton of carbon more per hectare than coffee plantations without shade trees, because more biomass is produced which is converted to humus in the soil. This is the equivalent of 3.7 tons per hectare a year.

Recently Stiftung Warentest, an independent German consumer organisation, confirmed that only a combination of organic and fair trade is truly sustainable (05/2016). In a comparison of six different certification logos, the testers came to a clear conclusion: “The Naturland Fair label sets the highest standards”.